Previous Videos

November 2016: Mephisto Waltz N.1 by Franz Liszt

This is possibly the most technically dificult piece in my repertory. An absolute athletic approach to organ playing, sometimes pretty crazy, and by far more difficult than the piano version. But that entire work means nothing if the listener do not perceive it as effortless. The music must sound consistent, fluid and spontaneous. That is what technique really is about. Those approaches in which we can see the effort of the performer, that's just show and has no artistic value. To reach this goal I always recommend Bach triosonatas. There is more of the triosonatas technique in my Mephisto Waltz N.1 than from any other work. At the end of the day, Bach is always there.

Raul Prieto Ramirez

The Video of the Month

February 2017: Broadway Baptist Fort Worth, TX

Raul Prieto Ramirez performs live in the Rildia Bee O'Bryan Cliburn, French style, organ built by Casavant Op. 3750

We start 2017 with a new series of videos: LVCS -Live Video Concert Summaries-. We will not upload full concerts because promoters deserve respect, and we still want to enjoy the concerts live instead of through a computer, right? But we hope this summaries will offer a bite of some fantastic instruments, my performances and the magic of the concerts. Please enjoy!!!!

Raul Prieto Ramirez

 

Youtube Chanel

More than 35 videos from live performances, takes from audience members and interviews

December 2017:

Marcel Dupre, Fugue from his Op.7 N.3 in g minor

It's not secret that I'm not a big fan of Marcel Dupre's music. I rather spend my time with Franck, Reger or Durufle. Nevertheless, his Op.7 N.3 has always been a fascinating piece for me. His fugue has widely been the target of jokes due to the dubious quality of its theme (you can sing it with the lyrics: "Mar-cel Du-pre, Mar-cel Du-pre, The - Hell is - this? The - Hell is - this?"). The joke is especially effective at the tempo and articulation of Dupre's own recording from the 1920s. But I always felt the theme reaches its full expressive power when performed at a higher tempo emphasizing the anxiety of those repeated motives with a stronger articulation. Then the whole fugue develops a powerful crazy dance spirit, and the quality of this music becomes evident and effective. Organists will think it has to be played completely legato throughout because it is DUPRE, but if you can rise over preconceived organist's rules and think as a musician, this piece of music can make its great quality shine as it is. Enjoy! 

Raul Prieto Ramirez